Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Annual:
2017/2018
Code:
HUX-1-233-s
Name:
Populism: Its Past and Present Disguises
Faculty of:
Humanities
Study level:
First-cycle studies
Specialty:
-
Field of study:
Social Informatics
Semester:
2
Profile of education:
Academic and practical
Lecture language:
English
Form and type of study:
Full-time studies
Course homepage:
 
Responsible teacher:
prof. Buzalka Juraj (juraj.buzalka@fses.uniba.sk)
Academic teachers:
prof. Buzalka Juraj (juraj.buzalka@fses.uniba.sk)
Module summary

Phenomenon of populism.

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Social competence
M_K001 participate in open discussion on political phenomenon of populism UX1P_K06 Activity during classes
Skills
M_U001 trace signs of populism in present-day global politics UX1P_U02 Activity during classes
Knowledge
M_W001 locate the phenomenon of populist politics in terms of concepts and approaches UX1P_W02 Essay
M_W002 undertand populism basing on case studies mostly dealing with East Central Europe UX1P_W13 Essay
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Social competence
M_K001 participate in open discussion on political phenomenon of populism - - - - - + - - - - -
Skills
M_U001 trace signs of populism in present-day global politics - - - - - + - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W001 locate the phenomenon of populist politics in terms of concepts and approaches - - - - - + - - - - -
M_W002 undertand populism basing on case studies mostly dealing with East Central Europe - - - - - + - - - - -
Module content
Seminar classes:

This course shall familiarize students with the phenomenon of populism. Approached from the perspective of its social-economic base, leadership, mobilization narratives, relations with religion, socialism, and capitalism, populism is particularly discussed on the material from East European past and present.
The course is divided into three parts. The first aims to locate the phenomenon of populist politics in terms of concepts and approaches. The second focuses on case studies mostly dealing with East Central Europe. The third part goes back to conceptual issues and asks to what extend shall we take into account populism in present-day global politics.
There are fifteen topics that might be discussed individually and/or in pairs. The particular sessions and basic texts for the course are:
1. People and politicians
Canovan, M. 1984. ‘People’, Politicians and Populism. Government and Opposition 19: 213–322.
2. Integralism
Holmes, D. 2000. Integral Europe: Fast-Capitalism, Multiculturalism, Neofascism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
3. Populist Zeitgesit
Cas Mudde (2004) The Populist Zeitgeist. Government and Opposition 39/4, pp. 541-563.
4. Why populism?
Rogers Brubaker (2017) Why Populism? Theory and Society 46/5, pp 357-385.
5. Populism and/as Civilisationism
Brubaker (2017) Between nationalism and civilisationism: the European populist moment in comparative perspective. Ethnic and racial studies.
6. Populism in Eastern Europe
Ionescu, G. 1969. Eastern Europe. In G. Ionescu and E. Gellner, eds., Populism: Its Meanings and National Characteristics, pp. 62–96. London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson.
7. Class and populism
Kalb, D. (2011). ‘Headlines of Nation, Subtexts of Class: Working Class Populism and the Return of the Repressed in Neoliberal Europe’, in D. Kalb and G. Halmai, (eds). Headlines of Nation, Subtexts of Class. Working Class Populism and the Return of the Repressed in Neoliberal Europe. London: Berghahn Books
8. Populism and ‘inteligentsia’
Zarycki, T. (2015). ‘Class analysis in conditions of a dual-stratification order’. East European Politics and Societies and Cultures 29(3): 711–8.
9. Populism and race
Gingrich, A. 2004. Concepts of Race Vanishing, Movements of Racism Rising? Global Issues and Austrian Ethnography. Ethnos 69 (2): 156–176.
10. Populism and religion
Buzalka, Juraj (2008). ‘Europeanization and post-peasant populism in Eastern Europe’, Europe-Asia Studies, 60:5, 757–771.
11. Populism and fascism
Umberto Eco (1995) Ur-Fascism. NYRB.
12. Populism as authenticity
Ballinger, P. 2004. ‘Authentic Hybrids’ in the Balkan Borderlands. Current Anthropology 45 (1): 31–60.
13. Populism and Memory
Juraj Buzalka (forthcoming 2018) Post-Peasant Memories: Populist or Communist Nostalgia. East European Politics, Societies, and Cultures.
14. Rethinking Populism
Ingolfur Bluhdorn and Felix Butzlaff (forthcoming 2018) Rethinking Populism: Peak democracy, liquid identity, and the performance of sovereignty. European journal of social theory
15. Populism as a myth?
Anton Jäger (2017) The Myth of Populism. Jacobin. https://jacobinmag.com/2018/01/populism-douglas-hofstadter-donald-trump-democracy

Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 100 h
Module ECTS credits 4 ECTS
Participation in seminar classes 30 h
Preparation for classes 30 h
Contact hours 2 h
Preparation of a report, presentation, written work, etc. 38 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

The student assessment consists of short mid-term discussion paper assessment (max. 1000 words) dealing with literature review and discussion about one of the topics covered by the syllabus. The end term paper is the final assessment of the course. The topic shall focus on empirical case that will be analyzed by using literature discussed on the course. Additional sources are welcomed to use in essays! The essay in English shall not exceed 2000 words.

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

The course has a form of seminar. The reading of recommended texts for each session is expected for the fruitful development of discussion in the class. The texts are selected on the basis of their merits to the theme of populism and consist of ‘classical’ works as well as up to date analyses dealing with recent phenomena. Additional reading gathered by individual searching for analyses of particular topics is appreciated.

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

Go to classes description.

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Buzalka, Juraj (2008). ‘Europeanization and post-peasant populism in Eastern Europe’, Europe-Asia Studies, 60:5, 757–771.
Juraj Buzalka (forthcoming 2018) Post-Peasant Memories: Populist or Communist Nostalgia. East European Politics, Societies, and Cultures.

Additional information:

None