Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Name:
The Rise of Populism and The Crisis of European Democracy
Course of study:
2017/2018
Code:
HSO-2-323-EG-s
Faculty of:
Humanities
Study level:
Second-cycle studies
Specialty:
E-Economy
Field of study:
Sociology
Semester:
3
Profile of education:
Academic and practical
Lecture language:
Polish
Form and type of study:
Full-time studies
Course homepage:
 
Responsible teacher:
prof. Mueller Klaus (klaus.mueller@fu-berlin.de)
Academic teachers:
prof. Mueller Klaus (klaus.mueller@fu-berlin.de)
Module summary

Concept and explanations of populism; the rise of populist parties in Europe, especially Poland; conflicts of populist governments with the European Union.

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Social competence
M_K001 Students will learn to cooperate with students from diverse countries and compare different political cultures SO2A_K04 Involvement in teamwork
Skills
M_U001 Students will know, how to - apply concepts and critical thinking to ongoing problematical trends in European and Polish politics - to evaluate newspapers and research reports SO2A_U02 Participation in a discussion
Knowledge
M_W001 On successful completion of the module, students will: - understand basic concepts of political sociology - learn about changes in European politics - be able to evaluate changes in the politics in Poland since 2015 SO2A_W14 Presentation
M_W002 Students will learn to integrate different theories and opinions and to articulate an own perspective SO2A_W04 Essay
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Social competence
M_K001 Students will learn to cooperate with students from diverse countries and compare different political cultures + - - - - - - - - - -
Skills
M_U001 Students will know, how to - apply concepts and critical thinking to ongoing problematical trends in European and Polish politics - to evaluate newspapers and research reports + - - - - - - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W001 On successful completion of the module, students will: - understand basic concepts of political sociology - learn about changes in European politics - be able to evaluate changes in the politics in Poland since 2015 + - - - - - - - - - -
M_W002 Students will learn to integrate different theories and opinions and to articulate an own perspective + - - - - - - - - - -
Module content
Lectures:
  1. Over the last decade, populist parties gained ground all over the European Union (EU). „Populism“ is understood as a political rhetoric, resp. politics which defends the authentic people against corrupt elites, national identity against multiculturalist subversion, the domestic economy against international corporations, people‘s sovereigtny against supranational institutions (specifically the bureaucrats of the EU). While populist parties took hold in Austria, Italy and elsewhere, the main threat is localized in Eastern Europe. In fact, Hungary and Poland are the first countries to face sanctions from the European Union for leaving the path of democracy.
    The course introduces into the debates on the causes and the implications of the populist rebellion against established politics. The first part gives an overview of the concept of populisms, is versions (left vs. right) and critiques. The second part will deal with the Polish situtation: the disappearence of left and centrist parties and the rise and takeover of PiS, the clash between Warsaw and the EU on the question of sovereignty and the prospects of sanctions.

    Session 1: Populism. Old Concepts & New Challenges (Brown et al. 2018; Stanley 2018; Kupchan 2018; Schmitter 2006; Zalan 2018).

    Session 2: Social Basis of Populism. Neoliberalism and the Failure of Social Democracy (Cuperus 2018; Kalb 2011).

    Session 3: Euroskepticism and the Democratic Deficit of Europe (Conti 2018; Dahrendorf 2003; Schmitter 2003; Mouffe 2013).

    Session 4: Challenges and Frictions of Poland’s Jump to the Market (Sachs 1993, Stepan & Linz 1997)

    Session 5: A New Golden Age? Economic Growth and Rising Inequality in Post-Communist Poland (OECD 2017; Bukowski & Novokmet 2017; Letki et al. 2014).

    Session 6: The Populist Takeover in Warsaw (Ost 2016; Kaminski 2016; Kisilowski 2017).

    Session 7: Poland’s Clash with Brussels (Sadurski 2014; Venice Commission 2017).

Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 100 h
Module ECTS credits 4 ECTS
Participation in seminar classes 30 h
Preparation for classes 30 h
Contact hours 2 h
Preparation of a report, presentation, written work, etc. 38 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

Presentation 25%
Participation 25%
Essay 50%

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

Course Requirements

All participants are expected to read the assigned literature in advance of the sessions and to contribute to the discussions. Participation is obligatory.

Presentation (15 to 20 minutes): students form groups to prepare a specific session (starting with session 2). The presentations (which should come with short outlines of 1-2 pages) should sketch the main theses of the specified readings, identify different opinions on the topic under discussion, raise questions and/or articulate problems of understanding. Personal statements are especially welcome. Connections to earlier sessions should be pointed out. The discussion will take the form of a conversation between the group, the plenum and the instructor.

Essays – due date: according the general datelines of the summer term of the faculty. All written essays should be submitted directly to me (or via e-mail). Topics have to be chosen from the schedule and should refer to the proposed literature. Written assignments are due on the date stipulated and it is not our policy to grant extensions except for illness or equivalent reasons. Length of Essays: 8-10 pp.

Plagiarism is an extremely serious academic offence. Written work from students which is not original in conception, organization and phrasing will not be accepted. The borrowing of material from other sources, whether in the form of direct quotation or paraphrasing, must be acknowledged. Direct quotations must be identified with quotation marks and referenced. When you follow someone’s ideas closely, or when you use specific information from a primary source (e.g., a government document) or a secondary source (e.g., a book or journal article), the source must be referenced. Failure to make such acknowledgement will make written work ineligible for grading. Serious offences will result in a grade of zero.

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

All sources will be made available via drop box

Brown, Matt et al. 2018: Europe's Populist Challenges. Origins, Supporters & Responses. AEI.

Bukowski, Pawel/Novokmet, Filip 2017: Inequality in Poland. Estimating the Whole Distribution by G-Percentile 1981-2015, WID.world Working Paper 2017/21 <http://bit.ly/2DGPxWU>.

Conti, Nicolo 2018: National Political Elites, the EU, and the Populist Challenge, Politics, Vol. 38, No. 3, 361-377.

Cuperus, René 2018: Social Democracy and the Populist Challenge, in Manwaring, Rob & Kennedy, Paul 2018: Why the Left Loses. The Decline of the Centre-Left in Comparative Perspective. Bristol: Policy Press, Chapter 12.

Dahrendorf, Ralf 2003: Making Sense of the EU. The Challenge of Democracy, Journal of Democracy, Vol. 14, No 4, 101-114.

European Commission u. a. 2017: Poland Catching-Up Regions. Washington, D.C.

Kalb, Don ed. 2011: Headlines of Nation, Subtexts of Class. Working-Class Populism & the Return of the Repressed in Neoliberal Europe. Berghan, Introduction.

Kaminski, Tomasz 2016: Radicalism, Populism or Nationalism? All Three in One, 4Liberty.

Kisilowksi, Maciej 2017: Poland. Authoritarian, not Patriotic, Politico, 28 Nov., 2017.

Kupchan, Charles 2018: The Battle Line for Western Values Runs Through Poland, New York Times, 11. 1. 2018 <http://nyti.ms/2E7dcNj>.

Letki, Natalia et al. 2014: The Rise of Inequalities in Poland and their Impacts. When Politicians Don’t Care but Citizens Do, in Nolan, Brian et al. 2014: Changing Inequalities & Societal Impacts in Rich Countries. Oxford, 488-513.

Linz, Juan & Stepan, Alfred 1997: Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation. Baltimore.

Marcinkiewicz, Kamil & Stegmaier, Mary 2016: The Parliamentary Elections in Poland, October 2015, Electoral Studies, Vol. 41, 213-224.

Mouffe, Chantal 2013: Most Countries in Europe are in a Post-Political Situation <

OECD 2016: Economic Survey: Poland. Paris.

Ost, David 2005: The Defeat of Solidarity. Anger and Politics in Postcommunist Europe. Ithaca, NY.

Ost, David 2016: Regime Change in Poland. Carried out from Within,

Pirro, Andrea & Taggart, Paul 2018: The Populist Politics of Euroscepticism in Times of Crisis. A Framework for Analysis, Politics, Vol. 38, No. 3, 253-262.

Sachs, Jeffrey 1990: What Is To Be Done?, The Economist, 13 Jan. 1990.

Sadurski, Wojciech 2014: Rights Before Courts. A Study of Constitutional Courts in Postcommunist States of Central and Eastern Europe, 2. Aufl. New York.

Schmitter, Philippe 2003: Europe’s Democracy and Democracy in Europe, Journal of Democracy, Vol. 14, No 4, 71-85.

Schmitter, Philippe 2006: A Balance of Vices and Virtues of &#x27;Populisms&#x27;. European University Institute, April 2006 <http://bit.ly/2mgbSje>.

Stanley, Ben 2017: Populism in Central and Eastern Europe, in Kaltwasser, Cristóbal et al. eds. 2017: The Oxford Handbook of Populism. New York: 140-160.

Szczerbiak, Aleks 2008: The Birth of a Bipolar Party System or a Referendum on a Polarizing Government? The October 2007 Polish Parliamentary Election, Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics, Vol. 24, No. 3, 415-443.

Venice Commission 2018: Opinion on Poland, December 2017.

Zalan, Eszter 2018: Polish Judiciary on Trial in EU Top Court, euobserver, 1 June 2018.

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Klaus Müller 2018a: Polens illiberale Revolution, in Prokla. Zeitschrift für kritische Sozialwissenschaft, Vol. 48, No 1, 115-136.
Klaus Müller 2018b: Polnische Paradoxien, to appear in International. Die Zeitschrift für Internationale Politik, November/December 2018.

Additional information:

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