Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Name:
Environmental sociology and social ecology: present environmental problems and global environmental change
Course of study:
2017/2018
Code:
HSO-2-419-EG-s
Faculty of:
Humanities
Study level:
Second-cycle studies
Specialty:
E-Economy
Field of study:
Sociology
Semester:
4
Profile of education:
Academic and practical
Lecture language:
English
Course homepage:
 
Responsible teacher:
prof. Bruckmeier Karl (kbrukm@hse.ru)
Academic teachers:
prof. Bruckmeier Karl (kbrukm@hse.ru)
Module summary

Environmental and resource use problems (environmental pollution, potential exhaustion of resources, degradation of the global environment, human modification of nature and ecosystems), environmental awareness, environmental behaviour, environmental movements, global social and environmental change (economic globalisation, climate change, biodiversity reduction, land use change and urbanisation), nature protection, environmental policies and sustainable development

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Social competence
M_K001 student is able to argue individually and critically about global environmental problems in modern society (in the epoch of “the anthropocene”) Activity during classes
Knowledge
M_W001 student understands the global problems of natural resource use (availability, scarcity, overuse, recycling) Oral answer
M_W002 student understands the environmental problems in modern societies, in the contexts of social, political and economic action Oral answer
M_W003 student understands local, regional or national resource use problems and their social and economic significance Oral answer
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Social competence
M_K001 student is able to argue individually and critically about global environmental problems in modern society (in the epoch of “the anthropocene”) + - - - - - - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W001 student understands the global problems of natural resource use (availability, scarcity, overuse, recycling) + - - - - - - - - - -
M_W002 student understands the environmental problems in modern societies, in the contexts of social, political and economic action + - - - - - - - - - -
M_W003 student understands local, regional or national resource use problems and their social and economic significance + - - - - - - - - - -
Module content
Lectures:
  1. Environmental sociology – history, main themes, approaches

    Session 1 Monday 09/04/18
    Introduction: Course themes, literature, forms of work
    Discussion: text 6 (Catton & Dunlap)

  2. Environmental sociology – main theories, perspectives, authors

    Session 2 Tuesday 10/04/18
    Discussion: text 4 (Beck)

  3. Present environmental problems – the heritage of industrial society

    Session 3 Wednesday 11/04/18
    Discussion: text 8 (Fischer-Kowalski)

  4. Working group presentation of text

    Session 4
    chapter 1 (Hannigan) + text 2, chapter 1 (Heinrichs and Gross) and discussion of the texts with the class

  5. Working group presentation of text

    Session 5
    4 (Beck) + 5 (Burke) and discussion of the texts with the class

  6. Social constructivism and critical environmental sociology

    Session 6 Monday 16/04/18
    Discussion: text 1, chapter 6 (Hannigan)

  7. Social ecology – history and development

    Session 7 Tuesday 17/04/18
    Discussion: text 5 (Burke)

  8. Social ecology – thematic profiles

    Session 8 Wednesday 18/04/18
    Discussion: text 9 (Haberl et al)

  9. Working group presentation of text

    Session 9
    13 (Martinez-Alier) + 16 (Rice) and discussion of the texts with the class

  10. Working group presentation of text

    Session 10
    1, chapter 2 (Hannigan) + text 10 (Janssen & Anderies) and discussion of the texts with the class

  11. Global environmental change – the anthropocene

    Session 11 Monday 23/04/18
    Discussion: text 17 (Steffen et al)

  12. Sustainable development – global scenarios

    Session 12 Tuesday 24/04/18
    Discussion: text 3, chapter 8 (Great Transition Scenario) and chapter 9 (Fortress Word Scenario)

  13. Outlook – social and environmental change in the 21st century

    Session 13 Wednesday 25/04/18
    Discussion: text 19 (Young et al)

  14. Working group presentation of text

    Session 14
    18 (Yanitsky) + 20 (Zielinska) and discussion of the texts with the class

  15. Working group presentation of text. Course evaluation: discussion in class

    Session 15
    2, chapter 18 (Heinrichs) + text 11 (Lidskog et al) and discussion of the texts with the class

Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 100 h
Module ECTS credits 4 ECTS
Participation in lectures 30 h
Preparation for classes 30 h
Realization of independently performed tasks 40 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

The course is evaluated in the last session, in oral from (discussion in the class).

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

The course is organized in lecture sessions (introductory lectures with short videos and subsequent discussion in the class) and (short presentations of texts from the course literature by working groups of students and discussion in the class).
From the students it is expected to participate in all sessions and to read the course literature individually, to be prepared for the discussions. The course does not include an examination.

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

The literature used in the lectures, discussions and seminars includes English texts from environmental sociology, social ecology and neighbouring disciplines. The literature will be emailed (electronic copies) to the participants before the course.
(a) Books (selected chapters to read):
1. Hannigan, John, 2006. Environmental Sociology. Second Edition. Routledge: London and New York.
2. Gross, Matthias; Heinrichs, Harald, eds., 2010. Environmental Sociology: European Perspectives and Interdisciplinary Challenges. Springer: Dordrecht et al.
3. Electris, C., et al., 2009. The Century Ahead: Four Global Scenarios. Tellus Institute, Boston.

(b) Articles:
4. Beck, Ulrich, 2000. Risk Society Revisited: Theory, Politics and Research Programmes (in: Barbara Adam et al., eds., The risk society and beyond: critical issues for social theory, Sage: London et al., pp. 211-229).
5. Burke, Bryan E., 2001. Hardin Revisited: A Critical Look at Perception and the Logic of the Commons. Human Ecology, 29, 4, pp. 449-476.
6. Catton, William R.; Dunlap, Riley E., 1978. Environmental sociology: A new paradigm. The American Sociologist, 13, pp. 41-49.
7. Foster, John Bellamy; Holleman, Hannah, 2012. Classical foundations for a post-exemptionalist sociology. American Journal of Sociology, 117, 7, pp. 1615-1673.
8. Fischer-Kowalski, Marina, 2003. On the History of Industrial Metabolism (in: Perspectives on Industrial Ecology, ed. Dominique Bourg & Suren Erkman, Greenleaf Publishing, pp. 35-45).
9. Haberl, Helmut, et al., 2011. A Socio-metabolic Transition towards
Sustainability? Challenges for Another Great Transformation. Sustainable Development, 19, pp. 1–14.
10. Janssen, M. A. and Anderies J. M., 2007. Robustness Trade-offs in Social-Ecological Systems. International Journal of the Commons, 1 (1), pp. 43-65.
11. Lidskog, R., Mol, A., Osterveer, P., 2015. Towards a global environmental sociology. Legacies, trends and future directions. Current Sociology. 63(3), pp. 339-368.
12. Mah, Alice, 2017. Environmental justice in the age of big data: challenging toxic blind spots of voice, speed, and expertise. Environmental Sociology, 3 (2), pp. 122-133.
13. Martinez-Alier, Joan, 2009. Social Metabolism, Ecological Distribution Conflicts, and Languages of Valuation. Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, 20, 1, pp. 58-87.
14. Martinez-Alier, J.; Pascual, U.; Vivien F.D.; Zaccai, E., 2010. Sustainable de-growth: Mapping the context, criticisms and future prospects of an emergent paradigm, Ecological Economics, 69 (9), pp. 1741-1747.
15. Mol, A.; Spaargaren, G., 2005. From Additions and Withdrawals to Environmental Flows: Reframing Debates in the Environmental Social Sciences. Organization and Environment, 18 (1), pp. 91-107.
16. Rice, James, 2007. Ecological Unequal Exchange: Consumption, Equity, and Unsustainable Structural Relationships within the Global Economy. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 48, 1, pp. 43-72.
17. Steffen, W., Crutzen , P. J., McNeill, J. R., 2007. The Anthropocene: Are Humans Now Overwhelming the Great Forces of Nature? Ambio, 36 (8), pp. 614-621.
18. Yanitsky, Oleg, 2012. Social Movements Study: On Possible Development of its Theoretical Apparatus. University of Salento, CSPS Working Paper Series 2.
19. Young, Oran R., et al., 2006. The globalization of socio-ecological systems: An agenda for scientific research. Global Environmental Change, 16, pp. 304-316.
20. Zielinska, Anetta, 2010. Management System of Protected Areas and its Monitoring in Poland. Economics & Sociology, 3,2: 121-127.

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Selected from last 10 years
Books
Individual author
1. Bruckmeier, Karl: Social-Ecological Transformation: Reconnecting Society and Nature, 2016 (Palgrave MacMillan, UK).
2. Bruckmeier, Karl: Natural Resource Use and Global Change: New Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Social Ecology, 2013 (Palgrave MacMillan, Houndmills, UK).

Co-author, chapters in books
1. Bruckmeier, Karl: Environmental conflicts – towards theoretical analyses of social-ecological systems (in: Gunilla Almered Olsson, Kenneth Hermele, eds, Natural Resources, Conflicts and Sustainable Development. Routledge. Publication in preparation)
2. Bruckmeier, Karl, Pires, Iva: Innovation as Transformation: Integrating the Socio-Ecological Perspectives of Resilience and Sustainability (in: Hugo Pinto, Teresa de Noronha, eds, Resilience and Regional Dynamics: An International Approach to a New Research Agenda, pp. 193-216. University of Algarve. Publication in preparation)
3. Bruckmeier, Karl; Westerberg, Håkan; Varjopuro, Riku : Baltic Sea Reconciliation in Practice: The Seal Conflict and its Mitigation in Sweden and Finland (in: R.A. Klenke, et al., Human-Wildlife Conflicts in Europe, pp.15-48. Berlin and Heidelberg: Springer Verlag, 2013).
4. Bruckmeier, Karl and Knutsson, Per: Swedish case study “Mobility” (in: Allan Williams, ed, Human Mobility in Coastal Regions: The Impact of Migration and Temporary Mobilities on Urbanization. Sapienza Università Editrice, Vol. II, September 2012).
5. Bruckmeier Karl: Human Ecology in the Knowledge Society (in: I.M. Pires, M. Gibert, L. Hens, eds., Studies in Human Ecology. Hanoi: Publishing House for Science and Technology, 2010).
6. Bruckmeier, Karl; Tovey, Hilary, eds: Rural Sustainable Development in the Knowledge Society (Ashgate: Aldershot, UK, 2008).

Articles in scientifc journals (peer reviewed)
7. Bruckmeier, Karl; Linke, Sebastian: Fisheries co-management – review of European experiences. Ocean and Coastal Management, 2015, 104: 170-181.
8. Stepanova, Olga; Bruckmeier, Karl: Resource use conflicts and urban-rural resource use dynamics in Swedish coastal landscapes: comparison and synthesis. Journal of Environmental
Policy and Planning, 2013 (DOI:10.1080/1523908X.2013.778173).
9. Bruckmeier, Karl: Problems of cross-scale coastal management in Scandinavia. Regional Environmental Change, 2014, 14, 6: 2151-2160.
10. Stepanova, Olga; Bruckmeier, Karl: The relevance of environmental conflict research for coastal management: a review of concepts, approaches and methods with a focus on Europe. Ocean and Coastal Management, 2013, 75: 20-32.
11. Bruckmeier, Karl: Towards Interdisciplinary rural research – theorizing nature-society relations. Natures, Sciences, Sociétés, 2011.
12. Bruckmeier, Karl: Sustainability between Necessity, Contingency and Impossibility. Sustainability, 2009, 1: 1388-1411 (www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability).
13. Bruckmeier, Karl; Engwall, Ylva; Knickel, Karl-Heinz; Kröger, Melanie: Evaluation of policies with respect to the multifunctionality of agriculture. Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, 2009: 347-367 (Special issue „Multifunctional Agriculture“).
14. Bruckmeier, Karl; Tovey, Hilary: Knowledge in Sustainable Rural Development: From Knowledge Forms to Knowledge Processes. Sociologia Ruralis, 2008, 48, 3: 313-329.

Additional information:

Karl Bruckmeier is Professor Department of Sociology of National Research University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow.
The course is given in 3 weeks (15 sessions of 90 minutes)
Every week 3 sessions “lecture + discussion” (60 minutes lecture + 30 minutes discussion of 1 text from the course literature in the class) and 2 seminar sessions (in each seminar 2 texts from the course literature are summarized by workings of students and the working groups guide also the discussion with the class)
Aims of the course
The course provides knowledge about environmental problems from research in environmental sociology and the connected interdisciplinary subject of social ecology. Through the participation in the course students should learn to understand
(1) causes and potential solutions to environmental problems;
(2) challenges of natural resource management in modern society;
(3) the relevance of natural resources for the development of economy and society.
The following issues and problems are covered in lectures, discussions and seminars: environmental and resource use problems (environmental pollution, potential exhaustion of resources, degradation of the global environment, human modification of nature and ecosystems), environmental awareness, environmental behaviour, environmental movements, global social and environmental change (economic globalisation, climate change, biodiversity reduction, land use change and urbanisation), nature protection, environmental policies and sustainable development.

  1. Theme. Environmental sociology – history, main themes, approaches
    - Origins and history: a new subdiscipline of sociology (since the 1970s, in USA, UK, France, Germany)
    - Themes: environmental problems, environmental awareness, natural resources and resource use practices, environmental movements, environmental policy
    - Basic concepts, approaches and methods
  2. Theme. Environmental sociology – main theories, perspectives, authors
    - William Catton and Riley Dunlap: the HEP/NEP-paradigms
    - Arthur Mol and Geert Spaargaren: ecological modernization and environmental movements
    - Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens: risk society and reflexive modernisation
    - Environmental sociology in Russia: Oleg Yanitsky, environmental movements
    - Environmental sociology in Poland: Anetta Zielinska, management of protected areas
  3. Theme. Present environmental problems – the heritage of industrial society
    - Environmental pollution (of air, water, soils through industry and agriculture), human modification of ecosystems (agriculture, industry, settlement and urbanisation)
    - Environmental awareness, value changes (“postmaterial values”) and changes of lifestyles, environmental movements (industrial countries, Southern countries – environmentalism of the poor)
    - Risk society, reflexive modernization, ecological modernization as attempts to deal with environmental problems
    - Poverty, population growth and development, tragedy of the commons, limits to growth (Malthusian questions)
  4. Theme. Social constructivism and critical environmental sociology
    Constructivism and realism in environmental sociology
    - John Hannigan et al: social construction of nature
    Critical theory of nature and society:
    - Immanuel Wallerstein (World System Theory), Jason Moore (World Ecology), John B. Foster (Ecological Marxism)
    - Joan Martinez-Alier (ecological distribution conflicts) and James Rice (unequal exchange): industrialized countries and “the global South”
  5. Theme. Social ecology – history and development
    - The broader field of interdisciplinary environmental social sciences: human, cultural, social, political ecology; environmental and ecological economics; environmental history; environmental anthropology
    - Various traditions of social ecology (Bronfenbrenner – social psychology, Bookchin – eco anarchism)
    - New social ecology: Austrian and German schools
    - Theoretical perspectives: human and societal relations with nature; societal metabolism; colonization of nature; metabolic regimes
  6. Theme. Social ecology – thematic profiles
    Thematic profiles of social ecology – main themes
    Theoretical research:
    - Nature-society interaction
    - Social-ecological systems
    Empirical research:
    - Food security and food sovereignty, global scenarios
    - Ecosystem services
  7. Theme. Global environmental change – the Anthropocene
    Global environmental change:
    - Global warming/anthropogenic climate change, biodiversity reduction, land use change and urbanization
    - Pollution of the oceans
    - Theory of the anthropocene
  8. Theme. Sustainable development – global scenarios
    - Sustainable development: discourse and concepts
    - Sustainable development: global scenarios
    - Sustainability and resilience of social-ecological systems
    - Social-ecological transformation and the future global society
  9. Theme. Outlook – social and environmental change in the 21st century
    - Global warming and sea level rise
    - Climate change: conflicts or adaptation
    - “Green growth”, limits to growth, degrowth
    - Global collapse or sustainability transformation