Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Annual:
2017/2018
Code:
HSO-2-327-II-s
Name:
Challenges to Globalization
Faculty of:
Humanities
Study level:
Second-cycle studies
Specialty:
Innovations and social interventions
Field of study:
Sociology
Semester:
3
Profile of education:
Academic and practical
Lecture language:
English
Form and type of study:
Full-time studies
Course homepage:
 
Responsible teacher:
prof. Mueller Klaus (klaus.mueller@fu-berlin.de)
Academic teachers:
prof. Mueller Klaus (klaus.mueller@fu-berlin.de)
Module summary

A dramatically changed world has put the capacities of nation states under stress. The course confronts basic concepts of global studies with new challenges to world politics.

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Social competence
M_K001 Students will learn how to cooperate with students from different faculties (humanities and technical subjects) and diverse countries SO1A_K07, SO2A_K06 Involvement in teamwork
Skills
M_U001 Students will know, how to - apply concepts and critical thinking to ongoing problematical trends in world development -question overoptimistic proclamations of a new age beyond the historical conflicts of the past SO1A_U02, SO2A_U06 Participation in a discussion,
Presentation,
Activity during classes,
Essay
Knowledge
M_W002 On successful completion of the module, students will: - understand basic concepts and theories of the multilevel process of globalization - acquire knowledge about different historical periods of globalization - be able to compare and evaluate competing approaches to globalization SO1A_W06, SO2A_W06 Presentation
M_W003 Students will learn to evaluate public media information in the light of social theory SO1A_W04, SO2A_W03 Participation in a discussion,
Presentation,
Essay,
Activity during classes
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Social competence
M_K001 Students will learn how to cooperate with students from different faculties (humanities and technical subjects) and diverse countries + - - - - - - - - - -
Skills
M_U001 Students will know, how to - apply concepts and critical thinking to ongoing problematical trends in world development -question overoptimistic proclamations of a new age beyond the historical conflicts of the past + - - - - - - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W002 On successful completion of the module, students will: - understand basic concepts and theories of the multilevel process of globalization - acquire knowledge about different historical periods of globalization - be able to compare and evaluate competing approaches to globalization + - - - - - - - - - -
M_W003 Students will learn to evaluate public media information in the light of social theory + - - - - - - - - - -
Module content
Lectures:
  1. A dramatically changed world has put the capacities of nation states under stress. New challenges overburden conventional politics. Since the 1990s, processes which escape the reach of nation states have been discussed under the label of globalization: economic, political, cultural trends. ‘Global governance’, i.e. forms of political coordination which include states, international organizations, corporations and civil society movements, promised solutions to the new problems. A decade later, the downsides of globalization came to the fore: new forms of inequality, huge movements of migrants, environmental degradation and climate change, information warfare etc. – The course confronts basic concepts and expectations of global studies resp. globalisation theory with new challenges to world politics.

  2. Globalization. Basic Concepts and Fundamental Problems

    Session 1 (2017) – Introduction. What is Globalisation? Globalists & Sceptics
    Giddens & Sutton 2013, Chapter 4: Globalisation; McGrew 2014; Stegner 2009, 1-16.
    Session 2 (2017) – Timelines of Globalization
    Stegner 2009, Chapter 2, 17-37; Scott 2014; Cox 2014.

  3. Global Problems – Global Solutions?

    Session 3 (2017) – Global Environmental Problems & Climate Catastrophe
    Giddens & Sutton 2013, Chapter 5
    Giddens 2009, 1-16 and 203-230.
    Session 4 (2017) – Mass Immigration: The Transformation of European Societies?
    Collier 2013, Chapter 1 & 2.

  4. Conflicts in the Global Order: Geopolitics and ‘Cyber War’

    Session 5 (2017) – After the End of the Cold War: ‘New World Order’ or ‘Clash of Civilizations’?
    Huntington 1996; Kagan 2002.
    Session 6 (2018) – America and the Crisis of Global Power
    Brzezinski 2012, Part I & II.
    Session 7 (2018) – ‘Cyberwar’: A New Sphere of Global Confrontation?
    Rid 2013, 1-54; 163-174; Dunn Cavelty 2012a, 2012b & 2015.

Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 102 h
Module ECTS credits 4 ECTS
Preparation for classes 34 h
Participation in lectures 30 h
Realization of independently performed tasks 34 h
Contact hours 4 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

Students of Humanities
Presentation 25%
Participation 25%
Essay 50%
Students of Technical Faculties
Presentation 50%
Discussion 50%

All participants are expected to read the assigned literature in advance of the sessions and to contribute to the discussions. Participation is obligatory.

Presentation (15 to 20 minutes): students form groups to prepare a specific session (starting with session 2). The presentations (which should come with short outlines of 1-2 pages) should sketch the main theses of the specified readings, identify different opinions on the topic under discussion, raise questions and/or articulate problems of understanding. Personal statements are especially welcome. Connections to earlier sessions should be pointed out. The discussion will take the form of a conversation between the group, the plenum and the instructor.

Essays (applies to students of the humanities) – due date: according the general datelines of the term of the faculty. All written essays should be submitted directly to me (or via e-mail). Topics have to be chosen from the schedule and should refer to the proposed literature. Written assignments are due on the date stipulated and it is not our policy to grant extensions except for illness or equivalent reasons. Length of Essays: 10-12 pp.

Plagiarism is an extremely serious academic offence. Written work from students which is not original in conception, organization and phrasing will not be accepted. The borrowing of material from other sources, whether in the form of direct quotation or paraphrasing, must be acknowledged. Direct quotations must be identified with quotation marks and referenced. When you follow someone’s ideas closely, or when you use specific information from a primary source (e.g., a government document) or a secondary source (e.g., a book or journal article), the source must be referenced. Failure to make such acknowledgement will make written work ineligible for grading. Serious offences will result in a grade of zero.

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

All students have to read all the literature related to all the session. For the essays, additional sources will be distributed.

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

-Baylis, Thomas et al. 2014: The Globalization of World Politics, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Brzezinksi, Zbigniew 2012: Strategic Vision. America & the Crisis of Global Power, New York: Basic Books.
Collier, Paul 2013: Exodus. How Migration is Changing Our World, Oxford: OUP.
Cox, Michael 2014: International History 1900-1990, in Baylis, Thomas et al. 2014, 66-79.
Dunn Cavelty, Miryam 2012a: The Militarisation of Cyber Security as a Source of Global
Tension, Strategic Trends 2012, 102-123.
Dunn Cavelty, Myriam 2012b: The Militarisation of Cyberspace: Why Less May Be Better, in
Czosseck, C. et al. 2012: 4th International Conference on Cyber Conflict, Tallin: NATO,
141-153.
Dunn Cavelty, Myriam 2015: The Normalisation of Cyber-International Relations, Strategic
Trends 2015: Key Developments in Global Affairs, 82-98.
Giddens, Anthony 2009: The Politics of Climate Change, Polity Press
Giddens, Anthony & Sutton, Philip 2013: Sociology, 7th ed.: Polity Press.
McGrew, Anthony 2014: Globalisation and Global Politics, in Baylis et al. 2014, 14-31.
Scott, Len 2014: From the Cold War to the World Economic Crisis, Baylis, Thomas et al. 2014, 66-80.
Stegner, Manfred 2009: Globalization. A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Rid, Thomas 2013: Cyberwar Will Not Take Place. Oxford University Press.

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Changing we-I balances in processes of transnational integration: Norbert Elias’s contribution to globalisation theory / Klaus MUELLER // W: ESA 2013 : 11\textsuperscript{th} conference: crisis, critique and change: Torino, 28–31 August, 2013: abstract book / European Sociological Association (ESA), University of Torino. Departament of Culture, Politics and Society. 2013.
Constructing a ‘New Cold War’: from confrontation to interaction and back / Klaus MUELLER // W: ESA 2015 [Dokument elektroniczny] : 12\textsuperscript{th} conference of the European Sociological Association 2015 : differences, inequalities and sociological imagination : Prague, 25–28 August 2015 : abstract book / European Sociological Association (ESA), Institite of Sociology of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IS CAS). — Wersja do Windows. — Dane tekstowe. — [Prague : s. n.]. 2015.
Globalisierung und Demokratie : Chancen für eine ökologische Global Governance? Klaus MÜLLER // Wissenschaft und Umwelt ; ISSN 0170-6977. — 2011 H. 14 Interdisziplinär : Demokratie & Umweltkrise : Brauchen wir mehr Mitbestimmung?, s. 10–18.
Global democracy : promises and delusions / Klaus MÜLLER // W: Spheres of global justice. Vol. 1, Global challenges to liberal democracy : political participation, minorities and migrations / ed. Jean-Christophe Merle ; co-editors Luc Foisneau, Christian Hiebaum, Juan Carlos Velasco. — Dordrecht, [etc.] : Springer, cop. 2013. — ISBN: 978-94-007-5997-8 ; e-ISBN: 978-94-007-5998-5. — S. 49–64.
Regional varieties of global inequalities : reclaiming space for public policies / Klaus MÜLLER // W: Global trends and regional development / ed. Nikolai Genov. — New York ; London : Routlege : Taylor & Franics Group, 2012. — (Routlege Studies in Development and Society ; 28). — Reworked papers presented at the international conference: Global trends and regional development : Berlin 2010.
Varieties of cosmopolitanism / Klaus MÜLLER // W: After the Soviet Empire : legacies and pathways : [39th World congress of the International Institute of Sociology : Yerevan, Armenia, June 11 – June 14, 2009] / ed. by Sven Eliaeson, Lyudmila Harutyunyan, Larissa Titarenko. — Leiden ; Boston : Brill, cop. 2016. — (Annales of the International Institute of Sociology ; ISSN 1568-1548 ; vol. 12). — ISBN: 978-90-04-29144-7 ; e-ISBN: 978-90-04-29145-4. — S. 381–391.

Additional information:

Literature and other sources will be provided by drop-box.