Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Name:
Economic Anthropology: Consumption, market and culture
Course of study:
2018/2019
Code:
HSO-2-232-II-s
Faculty of:
Humanities
Study level:
Second-cycle studies
Specialty:
Innovations and social interventions
Field of study:
Sociology
Semester:
2
Profile of education:
Academic and practical
Lecture language:
English
Form and type of study:
Full-time studies
Course homepage:
 
Responsible teacher:
prof. Skaptadóttir Unnur Dís (unnurd@hi.is)
Academic teachers:
prof. Skaptadóttir Unnur Dís (unnurd@hi.is)
Module summary

In the course the economic aspects of society and culture are examined. Globalization has created new field of research for economic anthropologists in their analysis of the relationship between the economic issues, society and meanings given to products in everyday life. The course will examine earlier field of research in economic anthropology about gift exchange, trade and production among peasants and new research on consumption patterns and trade in present times, on fair trade and global mass production of goods. Concepts such as work, leisure time ad markets are examined from anthropological perspectives. The economic crisis of communities, especially in Iceland, will further more be examined.

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Social competence
M_K001 Is aware of conseques of economic crisis in communities. SO2A_K04 Presentation,
Activity during classes
Skills
M_U001 Analyzes the relationship between the economic issues, society and meanings given to products in everyday life SO2A_U02 Presentation,
Activity during classes
M_U002 Examines work, leisure time ad markets are examined from anthropological perspectives. SO2A_U02 Presentation,
Activity during classes
Knowledge
M_W001 Student can show understanding of economic aspects of society and culture are examined SO2A_W02 Test,
Presentation,
Activity during classes
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Social competence
M_K001 Is aware of conseques of economic crisis in communities. + - - - - - - - - - -
Skills
M_U001 Analyzes the relationship between the economic issues, society and meanings given to products in everyday life + - - - - - - - - - -
M_U002 Examines work, leisure time ad markets are examined from anthropological perspectives. + - - - - - - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W001 Student can show understanding of economic aspects of society and culture are examined + - - - - - - - - - -
Module content
Lectures:
  1. Introduction, general discussion about the course and evaluations

    Students sign up for groups and on a list for discussion leaders

  2. What is Economic Anthropology?
  3. Theories and historical overview

    Wilk and Cliggett, chapter 1, 2 and 3
    Stuart Plattner (1989) Economic Behavior in Markets’ Economic Anthropology, Stanford: Stanford University Press.

  4. Society, power, politics and the economic. Influence of Durkheim and Marx

    Wilk and Cliggett, Chapter 4
    Plattner, Stuart (1989) Marxism. In Stuart Plattner (ritstj.) Economic Anthropology. Stanford: Stanford University Press

  5. Economic Globalization – consumption and production

    Nash, June. 2007. Consuming Interests: Water, Rum and Coca-Cola from Ritual Propitiation to Corporate Expropriation in Highland Chiapas. Cultural Anthropology, 22(4), 621-639.
    Jackson, Peter. 2004. Local consumption in a globalizing world. Royal Geographical Society, 29, 165-178
    Rothstein, Frances Abrahamer. 2005. Challenging Consumption Theory: Production and Consumption in Central Mexico. Critique of Anthropology, 25(3), 279-306.
    Goldín, Liliana 2012. From Despair to Resistance: MayaWorkers in the Maquilas of Guatemala. Anthropology of Work Review, 33(1): 25-32.

  6. Migration and migrant workers / work, division of labor and identities

    Núnez-madrazo Cristina 2007. Lviving ´Here and There‘: New Migration of Translocal Workers from Veracruz to the southerastern United States. Anthropology of Work Review XXVIII (3):1-6
    Cohen, Jeffrey H. 201l. Migration, Remittances and Household Strategies. Annual Review of Anthropology 40:103-14
    Skaptadóttir, Unnur Dís and Wojtynska, Anna (2008) Labour Migrants Negotiating Places and Engagements. In Bærenholdt J. O. and Granås B. (eds.) Mobility and Place. Enacting Northern European Periphery. Aldershot: Ashgate.
    Krishnamurthy, Mathangi. 2004. Resources and Rebels: A Study of Identity Management in Indian Call Centers. Anthropology of Work Review, 25(3-4), 9-18.
    Ramamurthy, Priti. 2003. Material Consumers, Fabricating Subjects: Perplexity, Global Connectivity Discourses, and Transnational Feminist Research. Cultural Anthropology, 18(4), 524-550.

  7. Ethical consumption

    Carrier, James G. 2007. Ethical Consumption. Anthropology Today, 23(4), 1-2.
    Besky, Sarah. 2008. Can a Plantation be Fair? Paradoxes and Possibilities in Fair Trade Darjeeling Tea Certification. Anthropology of Work Review, 29(1), 1-9.
    Fridell, Mara, Ian Hudson and Mark Hudson. 2008. With Friends Like These: The Corporate Response to Fair Trade Coffee. Review of Radical Political Economics, 40(1), 8-34.
    Moberg, Mark. 2005. Fair Trade and Eastern Caribbean Banana Farmers: Rhetoric and Reality in the Anti-Globalization Movement. Human Organization, 64(1), 4-15.
    Clarke, Nick, Clive Barnett, Paul Cloke and Alice Malpass. 2007. The Political Rationalities of Fair-Trade Consumption in the United Kingdom. Politics Society, 35(4), 583-607.

  8. Presentation of group work
  9. Gifts and debt

    Wilk and Cliggett chapter 5 and 6
    Strathern, Marilyn. 2012. Gifts money cannot buy. Social Anthropology 20(4):397-410.
    Graeber, David. 2012. On social currencies and human economies: some notes on the violence of equivalence. Social Anthropology 20(4): 411-428.
    Rice, James G. 2007. Icelandic Charity Donations: Reciprocity Reconsidered. Ethnology 46(1): 1-20.

  10. Final assesment
Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 100 h
Module ECTS credits 4 ECTS
Participation in lectures 30 h
Preparation for classes 22 h
Preparation of a report, presentation, written work, etc. 22 h
Realization of independently performed tasks 22 h
Contact hours 4 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

Participation in class 30%
a) General participation in class
b) Students will raise discussions and questions based on the readings. They will summarize the articles and then draw out two questions for discussion. Students will sign up for this in the first day of class which articles they want to be responsible for.
Group assignment 20%
Students, two or three together, will work on assignment in which they use the obtained knowledge to analyse some economic aspect of their daily lives. Students will present the assignment to their fellow students in class with power point presentation. They must bring something to show to the class, an object, a picture etc. In the presentation they have to refer to some of the course reading.
Test 50%
Test in the last class based on all the readings in the course

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

Prerequisites and additional requirements not specified

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

Richard R. Wilk og Lisa C. Cliggett, 2007. Economies and Cultures: Foundations of Economic Anthropology. Cambridge, MA: Westview press.
Other readings will be provided as pfd documents (go to topic description).

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Additional scientific publications not specified

Additional information:

None